Sunday, July 19, 2009

Sadly, Sa'ad Hariri Is Not The Answer.



Lebanon has failed ever since its modern creation, over sixty years ago, to act as an independent sovereign nation. And unfortunately that is not about to change. A nation state is an artificial creation, a social, and political and an economic contract between inhabitants of an area of land based on a strong element of a common destiny and strong cultural ties. If the people in question fail to see citizenship as the single most important trait in defining who they are then they would have lost all legitimate claims to nationhood or a state of their own. In that case dissolving the state would be far more preferable than the charade and the pretense that a country exists when in reality it is a collection of irresponsible. Immature and selfish tribal lords who have inherited their position of power.
Lebanon is at that proverbial fork in the road where it will either take positive meaningful steps towards acting as an independent responsible democracy that belongs to all its citizens or it will continue its inevitable slide into marginalization, into the abyss of failed states. This is why the task of the designated Prime Minister, Sa’ad Hariri is so crucial. Mr. Hariri has not shown an ability to lead by motivating his fellow Lebanese to renounce the petty concerns that divide them in favour of adopting a singular concern, a Lebanese identity. His efforts to form a cabinet have dragged for over a month during which he has consulted with the Saudi Arabian government, the Egyptian government, the Iranian government, indirectly the Syrian government, the Western governments and many of the leaders of the Lebanese opposition with no tangible results to show for all of these efforts. This strategy of appeasement is a clear demonstration of the lack of vision and determination by Mr. Hariri to stand up for the interests of the country. The primary task that is facing Mr. Hariri is the articulation of a Lebanese identity that is capable of acting on its own and that looks at the Lebanese not as a mixture of different religious sects who happen to co- habitate in Lebanon but as Lebanese citizens who happen to have different religious beliefs. Mr. Hariri must act by forming a cabinet composed of those who are best suited to perform the assigned task no matter who they chose to pray to and irrespective of their gender or sexual orientation. The only qualification to join the cabinet is a strong belief in the nation and the ability to perform the assigned task better and more efficiently than anyone else. Lebanese cabinet ministers must be above all believers in the sovereignty, independence of Lebanon and the equal human rights for all their fellow Lebanese. The prime minister designate must form a Lebanese government that would not compromise with the opposition leaders. Mr. Hariri has to renounce openly and strongly all manifestations of sectarianism in the Lebanese body politic, transform the Al Mustaqbal into a genuinely diverse Lebanese political party and announce his willingness to fight for the implementation of policies that promote social justice, create job opportunities and protect the environment. Sadly there are no indications that Sa’ad Hariri is seriously considering any of the above. His reticence to do the right thing only makes the Lebanese project less sound.

4 comments:

iglina said...

i've read this article on yalibnan and i found it really interesting. only now i'm realizing that you are the guy who wrote about baalbaki paintings in blackmisthsoflebanon blog!nice to meet ya! :-)

ghassan karam said...

Iglina,
Yes I am the one. I decided to compile many of the previous posts on YaLibnan and other places before I lose all of them. I still have around twenty to add to this unadvertised blog . I do also keep a Podcast of most of these comments.
I still have not figured out where to see the work of Baalbaki. I would love even a poster of the lower left hand corner of the Baalbaki painting that was in Beirut Art Center.

iglina said...

why don't you call the Beirut Art Center or stop by when you'll be in Beirut? They may provide you with more info about baalbaki painting.
i think i read most of your articles on YaLibnan! it's good idea to have all of them together in this blog.
Anyway... if Saad Hariri is not the answer, who/what is the answer?? Hehe, just an idea to develop in your next article! Keep it going! :-)

ghassan karam said...

Iglina,
As I have often argued before my sympathies lie with the March 14 rather than March 8. Yet we should not expect the current leadership of March 14 to deliver on any meaningful changes. Most of March 14 would be pleased to re-engineer a return to the Lebanon of the 1960's , a Lebanon that embodied all the contradictions that have been pulling the country into smithereens. The irony is that I would much rather have March14 in control but I am convinced that they will not advance the case of social justice, human rights or protect the environment.

 

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